[CLOSED] Two new research internship for 2017: psychoacoustics of singing voice, and datamining of baby cries

CREAM is looking for talented master students for two research internship positions, for a duration of 5-­6months first half of 2017 (e.g. Feb­‐June ’17). UPDATE (Jan. 2017): The positions have now been filled. 

The first position mainly involves experimental, psychoacoustic research: it is examining the link between between increased/decreased pitch in speech and singing voice and the listener’s emotional response. It will be supervised by Louise Goupil & JJ Aucouturier, and is suitable for a student with a strong interest in experimental psychology and psychoacoustics, and good acoustic/audio signal processing/music production skills. See the complete announcement here: [pdf]

The second position is a lot more computational: it involves building audio pattern recognition tools in order to datamine a large corpus of audio recordings of human infant cries for acoustical patterns informative of the babies’ development of linguistic/communicative abilities. It will be supervised by JJ Aucouturier, in collaboration with Kazuo Okanoya and Yulri Nonaka from the University of Tokyo in Japan. It is suitable for a student with strong audio machine learning/music information retrieval skills and programming experience in Matlab or (preferably) Python. See the complete announcement here: [pdf]

Applications: send a CV and cover letter by email (see announcement). Interviews for selected applicants will be held in December’16-January’17.

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Ministry of Silly Speech : Infinite numbers of prosodic variations with C.L.E.E.S.E.

C.L.E.E.S.E. (Combinatorial Expressive Speech Engine) is a tool designed to generate an infinite number of natural-sounding, expressive variations around an original speech recording. More precisely, C.L.E.E.S.E. creates random fluctuations around the file’s original contour of pitch, loudness, timbre and speed (i.e. roughly defined, its prosody). One of its foreseen applications is the generation of very many random voice stimuli for reverse correlation experiments, or whatever else you fancy, really.

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